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LET'S CHAT OVER TEA WEEKLY ARTICLE BELOW!

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"We may see our kids everyday, and never truly know who they are"...

  

lET'S CHAT OVER TEA WEEKLY ARTICLE

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Weekly Article

  

KUNTA KAEP?

BY

J. HIGDON

The history of the civil rights movement doesn’t exist without profound leaders clashing about what route to take on the road towards equality, freedom and justice. Whether it was W.E.B Du Bois who declared segregation was necessary, or Booker T. Washington believing acceptance from other races wasn’t a priority, they both agreed that education and entrepreneurship was the main component towards African Americans liberation. But no two leaders differed more than Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and pre- Mecca Malcolm X. Dr. King’s I Have A Dream speech vs Malcolm X’s By Any Means Necessary declaration created a narrative that further brewed division among a community not only fighting for their rights against white America, but also among themselves. Colin Kaepernick’s attempt to bring awareness to police brutality and systematic injustice three years ago by kneeling during the National Anthem is still causing a rift among leaders, analyst, and the general public.  The NFL’s recent illegitimate attempt to offer a workout in front of 32 teams was relocated after Kaep refused to sign a “biased” waiver, no outside media was allowed access, and other optics that may have negated Kaepernick’s chance of ever playing in the league again. Stephen A. Smith, Shannon Sharpe and various other African American commentators denounced Kaepernick’s defiant approach and choice of wearing a Kunta Kintae shirt. I’m pretty sure Kaepernick knew wearing slave referenced apparel in front of owners would create more controversy. Slaves were kidnapped, beaten, raped and, separated from their families. Being an ex-football player with a Nike endorsement and a receiving a large settlement hardly equates to slavery. In the past I’ve been an, “I stand with Kaep” supporter, vowing not to attend any games, or buy NFL gear. Cause while I still believe it’s unamerican to think someone is unamerican for not standing during the anthem, I’m kind of over the ideals that separate and define who is truly for the people. Whether you choose to raise a fist, take a knee, or scholastically change the game doesn’t matter. The only thing that is significant is the result. And that still is LIBERTY AND JUSTICE FOR ALL.